Cybersecurity: half of employees admit they are taking shortcuts from telework

Cybersecurity: half of employees admit they are taking shortcuts from telework Cybersecurity

Half of employees take cybersecurity shortcuts while working from home, which could expose their organization to cyber attacks or data breaches.

The Coronavirus pandemic has forced employers and employees to adapt quickly to remote work. Often, without the attentive gaze of IT security teams, remote workers take more risks online and in data processing than in the office.

Analysis by researchers at cybersecurity company Tessian reveals that 52% of employees think they can get away with more risky behaviors when working from home, such as sharing confidential files by email instead of use more reliable mechanisms.

Employees don’t deliberately ignore safety practices, but
 home work distractions have an impact on the way people work

According to Tessian’s report The State of Data Loss Report, the main reasons employees do not fully follow the same security practices as usual include working from their own device, rather than a device provided by the company, as well as the feeling that ‘They may take additional risks because they are not monitored by IT departments.

In some cases, employees don’t deliberately ignore safety practices, but the distractions of working from home, such as babysitting, roommates and not having an office like the office, have an impact about the way people work.

And some employees say they have to cut back on security because they’re under pressure to get the job done quickly. Half of those surveyed said that they had to find alternatives to security policies in order to do their job effectively – suggesting that in some cases security policies are too great an obstacle for employees working at home can adapt to it.

There are a number of simple steps that can be taken to enhance security without hampering productivity

However, by adopting workarounds, employees could endanger their organization in the face of cyberattacks, especially as hackers are increasingly turning to remote workers.

“People will save on best security practices when working remotely and find workarounds if security policies disrupt their productivity in these new working conditions,” said Tim Salder, CEO of Tessian. “But it only takes a misdirected email, a poorly stored data file or a weak password for a business to face a serious data breach.”

If the rise of telework poses additional challenges for employees and employers, there are a number of simple steps that can be taken to enhance safety without hampering productivity. One of them is to use multi-factor authentication, which is an additional barrier to defense and helps prevent cybercriminals from accessing accounts – and possibly corporate data.

Rate article
Add comment